Interview With Georgie – The Design Society August 2015

Tell us a little about your background in design  – I worked a lot in practise during my years at university, during holidays and even 1 or 2 days a week during my diploma. Soon after graduating from the Bartlett School of Architecture, at UCL, and completing my chartership, I was eager to start my own firm. Due to working during my education, the extra contacts and experience I gained was advantageous for setting out on my own by the age of 27. I haven’t looked back since, and in the last 10 years have had the privilege of working with a loyal client base who have entrusted me with some great projects. Our practise does everything from planning and feasibility, detailed construction design, interior design and bespoke furniture, mostly in prime London locations.

. How would you describe your personal interior design style? – Because of my architectural background, my interior design style is driven by the function and form of a space and how light, circulation and sight lines are influenced. When this is established, I apply fresh colour palettes, natural materials and textures, with the aim of retaining a common thread throughout a scheme. My projects tend to have industrial elements mixed with classic features. We tend to work a lot in period properties in London, and its important to me to stay true to the original architecture.

. Where does your design inspiration come from? – Most of the sources I draw upon, have a hint of the nostalgic about them. Paulo Mendes Da Rocha and his use of ceramics, concrete and glazing is incredible. Richard Neutra, my all time favourite, has always inspired me with his classic 40’s and 50’s houses, like the Kaufman House, and his use of clean lines and natural materials. I strive to create timeless and classic interiors, like these.

. In what direction do you feel that design is moving towards in a general sense? –I think interiors are getting less whimsical or ‘themed’, and are striving to keep things integrated and true to the architecture they inhabit. This means that hopefully they will remain installed for many years. It breaks my heart when you see skips throughout London, full of brand new kitchens and slabs of marble.

. Name five key themes to consider when approaching design in 2015 and beyond. –

1) Sustainable and as ecologically minded as possible

2) Natural textures

3) Eclectic kitchens and joinery

4) Design informed by the architecture it inhabits

5) Functional and stripped back

. If you could offer one piece of advice when it comes to interior design schemes, what would it be? – To revisit the brief again and again which then informs the way the scheme develops. A lot of clients need to be interviewed on the way they live, what’s important to them, and what they really want, not what they think they should want! It is also important to view a project as a whole, with a common language, this gives projects a strong identity.

. How important are The International Design and Architecture Awards as recognition of talent and achievement? – The awards are very well revered and an excellent forum to display the best of interior design and architecture from all around the world. An award for both principles is essential as they are intrinsically linked, and viewing them as an international collective means that the designs are extremely diverse and interesting. It’s an absolute privilege to be a part of it.

. What projects are you currently working on? – I’m currently working on Margaret Thatcher’s former house in Belgravia, we have extended the mews and reconfigured it throughout, its been quite a journey. We have ongoing projects with our long standing clients, which we thoroughly enjoy. They include a few basement extensions and large lateral apartments. We’ve also got a few new build projects. One is a mansion of Georgian proportions in Kingston, it has literally fulfilled the dream of a little girl who years ago dreamt of being an architect!

. What are your aims and goals for the next twelve months? – As well as finishing the aforementioned projects as best I can, I am currently at the feasibility stage of some interesting developments which I hope come to fruition. One of them is for a high end retirement complex, and it turns out surprisingly, that this market want modern minimalism more than others, which will be an exciting challenge.

 

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